Best Practice Statements

The resources below are free to download. Please revisit this section regularly, as more best practice resources will become available.


  1. Best Practice Statement: The use of topical antiseptic/antimicrobial agents in wound management, 2nd edition
    Best Practice Statement: The use of topical antiseptic/antimicrobial agents in wound management, 2nd editionVIEW PDF

    This document has been compiled to fulfill a distinct need. The literature on the management of wound infection has been criticised for its paucity of reliable evidence. This, we believe, is because there are Cochrane-style systematic reviews drawing attention...

  2. Effective management of wound infection and quality of life
    Effective management of wound infection and quality of lifeVIEW PDF

    Infection is a significant problem for people with wounds, as it can delay healing, result in unpleasant symptoms such as exudate and pain, increase length of treatment, and result in hospital admissions with prolonged stays, raising the costs of care. It...

  3. Your chance to peer review two best practice statements

    Visit the Wounds UK peer review website to read and comment on two new best practice statements

  4. Best Practice Statement: The use of topical antiseptic/antimicrobial agents in wound management
    Best Practice Statement: The use of topical antiseptic/antimicrobial agents in wound managementVIEW PDF

    This Best Practice Statement has been produced in accordance with the standards set out by the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) collaboration (AGREE, 2003). A working group was formed as a result of concern arising from a paper...

  5. Consensus Document: PHMB and its potential contribution to wound managementVIEW PDF

    If the use of PHMB is to ascend into the armoury of the UK wound care clinician, there needs to be careful review of its effectiveness, control of its use in clinical practice, and education of clinicians at the forefront of wound care. It is the intention...

  6. Best Practice Statement: Care for the Older Person's Skin (First Edition)VIEW PDF

    Those charged with caring for the sick and vulnerable in the UK are faced with the challenge of ensuring that their practice is of the highest standards, while often working with heavy workloads which can be a barrier to reviewing research literature on...

  7. Best Practice Statement: Development of a FormularyVIEW PDF

    By using this document it is hoped that a relevant wounds dressing formulary can be created which includes a range of clinically- and cost-effective products to meet the patient’s wound care requirements, regardless of care setting.

  8. Best Practice Statement: Gauze-based negative pressure wound therapyVIEW PDF

    This Best Practice Statement has been developed in an attempt to take the first steps towards reaching a consensus on the use of gauze-based negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). This technique, also known as the Chariker-Jeter method, was first published...

  9. Best Practice Statement: Minimising Trauma and Pain in Wound ManagementVIEW PDF

    Pain can affect everyone.The psychological impact of pain cannot be measured nor underestimated and is likely to affect healing. Poor techniques in wound care can further traumatise wounds leading to additional pain and slowed healing or other complications....

  10. Best Practice Statement: Optimising Wound CareVIEW PDF

    Clinicians who care for patients with wounds in the UK and Ireland are faced with the challenge of ensuring that their practice is of the highest standard, however, in order to do this they require the support of their organisations. Unfortunately, many...